Did you know that downhill skiing on Mount Royal was a thing? Well, it was! And there’s proof that Montrealers skied on the mountain and we’ll tell you where to find it. Some of it is at the Outremont summit, a place not many know of. 

All about the History of Downhill Skiing on Mount Royal

If you spend some time on Mount Royal, you’ll notice a rusted tower with metal wheels on a cross arm in the distance. It may remind you of being on a ski trip because it is a piece of leftover history from when a few areas of Mount Royal were used for downhill skiing.

March 1963

Back in 1944, raspberry bushes and trees were removed by the U of M so that a ski hill could be built on Mount Royal! There was even a T-bar lift to bring skiers up the hill.

In that day and time, you paid just 25 cents on weekdays and 50 cents on weekends for a lift up the ski hill.

The time of skiing on Mount Royal ended in the 1970s.

But, things could change. In fact, not too long ago, a Montreal non-profit group wants to re-introduce downhill skiing on the mountain. 

The Outremont Summit and Beyond

In the 1990s, trees were planted once again on the old ski slope. Although there is a no-trespassing rule, many hikers still follow the hill’s path, which is evident from the path’s wear and tear.

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You can find another rusting ski-lift from the past on Vincent-D’Indy Avenue, close to the Edouard-Monpetit metro stop.

Take a walk to the summit and look out! You’ll see that the path narrows and starts bringing you downhill to the Cote-des-Neiges park entrance.

Don’t leave without seeing everything!

There’s a stone lookout on top of the remains of a ski jump. It was once part of the U of M winter complex. The view isn’t amazing now because the trees aren’t trimmed, but it’s the perfect place to stop and take a breather.

Who knows what will come of the new proprosal to re-introduce downhill skiing on Mount Royal. There are pros and cons either way, depending on how you see things.