This man tried to debunk the theory that people “need” between 7 and 8 hours of sleep at night. So, he tried an experiment…

He decided to change his sleep pattern – one that most people follow, which is called a “monophasic pattern.” This particular pattern is defined as getting all your necessary sleep in one long chunk.

He would instead sleep in shorter phases, like naps. This type of pattern is known as a polyphasic pattern. In essence, they sleep for short periods at a time, several times each day.

The man tried the “Uberman schedule that involves napping for 20 minutes per day, six times throughout the day. If you can do some quick mental math, you’ll see that the total amount of sleep you’d get following this schedules is a mere 2 hours in a given day.

Do you know that if we actually slept this way and this little, we’d add about 2 decades worth of awake time!

Read also: How Long Should You Nap to Get the Biggest Brain Benefits?

Okay, so instead of choosing this extreme schedule, he opted for what’s called the “Everyman,” which lets you actually sleep 4 1/2 hours at night plus 2 naps during the day, for 20 minutes each. Between the night sleep and the 2 naps, his net hours slept would equal 5 hours and 10 minutes of sleep each day.

He did this even though his doctor warned against it stating that he’d experience memory and cognitive problems, irritability, slow reaction times, and more.

So, how did he do?

The first and second days were really hard. By the second day, he could barely complete his daily functions. His doctor wasn’t wrong.

On the 5th day, he giggled a lot! And on the 7th day, he was in a devastating state and just had to get more sleep.

The results: He would not recommend these sleep patterns. While it could somehow work for some, most people really do need those 7 or 8 hours of sleep every night to recharge their batteries and feel rested and refreshed.

Just think about this for a while…this is how new mothers sleep for several months, if not years and not only do they feel awful, they often have to deal with round-the-clock responsibilities – sometimes without ever getting a break.